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  • 17 Sep 2014
    TransPerfect is looking for qualified Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian or Swedish into Native English translators interested in long term freelance collaboration. We’re looking for candidates experienced in any/all fields to join our network of TLC certified linguists. Applicants must: Be a native speaker of the target language Have a college degree and 5 years translation experience OR advanced degree and 3 years translation experience. Produce documented proof of educational background Document practical/translation experience in his/her area of expertise Interested parties please fill in our online application: http://web.transperfect.com/LinguistApplication/linguist_app.html and reference this posting. Applicants will be asked to complete a test translation and sign a confidentiality agreement. Please note: Only qualified applicants will be contacted. No phone inquiries please.
    557 Posted by TransPerfect Barcelona
  • TransPerfect is looking for qualified Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian or Swedish into Native English translators interested in long term freelance collaboration. We’re looking for candidates experienced in any/all fields to join our network of TLC certified linguists. Applicants must: Be a native speaker of the target language Have a college degree and 5 years translation experience OR advanced degree and 3 years translation experience. Produce documented proof of educational background Document practical/translation experience in his/her area of expertise Interested parties please fill in our online application: http://web.transperfect.com/LinguistApplication/linguist_app.html and reference this posting. Applicants will be asked to complete a test translation and sign a confidentiality agreement. Please note: Only qualified applicants will be contacted. No phone inquiries please.
    Sep 17, 2014 557
  • 11 Jan 2014
    These days, more companies turn to a paperless form of communication, and e-mail plays a major role in this. It is currently the best and fastest way to get in touch with your colleagues. And most companies have embraced this form of communication. It should be noted, however, that not all individuals know how to use e-mail to communicate to their colleagues in a professional manner. Because anything that is done online always seems to have an informal vibe to it, many forget that crafting e-mails in your workplace should still be done in a professional manner. If you are guilty of this, here are some ways to help you in making your e-mails more professional. 1. Remember to Practice Proper Etiquette. Writing e-mails is the same as writing actual letters. The rules also apply to e-mails. It should always be written in a formal and professional manner. While e-mails may be a little bit more informal than typical business letters, make sure that you are not overly casual in your correspondences. As much as possible, include a salutation and a brief greeting before you get into the meat of your message. Politeness will always be appreciated. 2. Make it Concise. Don’t write a novella, keep your points brief and to the point. If you must write a long e-mail, then be sure to summarize your point at the end of your e-mail. If possible, use the bullet form when itemizing details. Always be mindful of your reader’s time. 3. Avoid Capslock. It must be reiterated that writing in capslock makes it seem that you are shouting. Limit, if not completely avoid, the use of capslock in your e-mails. If you would like to reiterate the importance of your e-mail, then use words that will indicate this. Seeing an e-mail written in capital letters can be quite jarring, so avoid this at all costs. 4. Be Mindful of Your Tone. Even if you tone down on the capslock, you will still have to make sure that your e-mail comes off as polite and objective. Avoid using words that may come on too strong. Remember that your tone cannot be heard by the recipient of your email so make sure that you are not misunderstood. Use professional words, and avoid being emotional in your messages. 5. Use Proper English. Granted that you are using the Internet to send that e-mail, it is still best to avoid Internet lingo or abbreviations. Keep the LOL’s and the BRB’s to your personal communications, and stick to the long-form of the words. It reflects highly against your professionalism if you tend to use these terms in professional e-mails. 6. Grammar and Spelling are Still Important. Before you hit “send”, double-check your message. Make sure that it is grammatically-correct, and that your spelling is flawless. Pay extra-close attention to the spelling of the name of the recipient. Communicating professionally via e-mail is easy if you are used to it. Keep these reminders in mind, and you will be an expert in sending out e-mails the corporate way.   TO3000 will enable you to keep track of your contacts.More information: http://www.to3000.com/25% discount (for readers of this blog): http://special.translation3000.com/special_to3000 
    503 Posted by Vitaly Pedchenko
  • These days, more companies turn to a paperless form of communication, and e-mail plays a major role in this. It is currently the best and fastest way to get in touch with your colleagues. And most companies have embraced this form of communication. It should be noted, however, that not all individuals know how to use e-mail to communicate to their colleagues in a professional manner. Because anything that is done online always seems to have an informal vibe to it, many forget that crafting e-mails in your workplace should still be done in a professional manner. If you are guilty of this, here are some ways to help you in making your e-mails more professional. 1. Remember to Practice Proper Etiquette. Writing e-mails is the same as writing actual letters. The rules also apply to e-mails. It should always be written in a formal and professional manner. While e-mails may be a little bit more informal than typical business letters, make sure that you are not overly casual in your correspondences. As much as possible, include a salutation and a brief greeting before you get into the meat of your message. Politeness will always be appreciated. 2. Make it Concise. Don’t write a novella, keep your points brief and to the point. If you must write a long e-mail, then be sure to summarize your point at the end of your e-mail. If possible, use the bullet form when itemizing details. Always be mindful of your reader’s time. 3. Avoid Capslock. It must be reiterated that writing in capslock makes it seem that you are shouting. Limit, if not completely avoid, the use of capslock in your e-mails. If you would like to reiterate the importance of your e-mail, then use words that will indicate this. Seeing an e-mail written in capital letters can be quite jarring, so avoid this at all costs. 4. Be Mindful of Your Tone. Even if you tone down on the capslock, you will still have to make sure that your e-mail comes off as polite and objective. Avoid using words that may come on too strong. Remember that your tone cannot be heard by the recipient of your email so make sure that you are not misunderstood. Use professional words, and avoid being emotional in your messages. 5. Use Proper English. Granted that you are using the Internet to send that e-mail, it is still best to avoid Internet lingo or abbreviations. Keep the LOL’s and the BRB’s to your personal communications, and stick to the long-form of the words. It reflects highly against your professionalism if you tend to use these terms in professional e-mails. 6. Grammar and Spelling are Still Important. Before you hit “send”, double-check your message. Make sure that it is grammatically-correct, and that your spelling is flawless. Pay extra-close attention to the spelling of the name of the recipient. Communicating professionally via e-mail is easy if you are used to it. Keep these reminders in mind, and you will be an expert in sending out e-mails the corporate way.   TO3000 will enable you to keep track of your contacts.More information: http://www.to3000.com/25% discount (for readers of this blog): http://special.translation3000.com/special_to3000 
    Jan 11, 2014 503
  • 20 Dec 2013
      Translating documents is a job that would require a lot of concentration and time. If you think it is a no-brainer job, think again. It actually takes a lot of effort to make sure that you are translating documents correctly.   If you are looking to work as a translator, one of your decisions would be whether to work as an in-house translator or a freelance translator. There are pros and cons to both, and in this article, we will be discussing the advantages and disadvantages of working as a freelance translator.   If you are working as a freelance translator, you get to work in the comforts of your home. You can wake up, brew your coffee, and start working while wearing your pajamas! You get to manage your own schedule, and you can take as many breaks as you want. All you need to do is complete all your assignments within the given time table. If you have kids, you can work around your children’s school schedule – you can really be a hands-on parent by working freelance.   Since you are given free rein of your schedule, it is also easy for you to take vacation breaks as needed. You won’t have to go through a long process of getting an approval for your leaves. You can just advise your client beforehand, and you can be on your merry way on your vacation. Just make sure, though that you do not have any pending tasks, or it will really inconvenience your clients.   Another advantage to working freelance is your ability to take on more jobs as needed. If your schedule can handle it, you can speak with other clients and continue working for both. You won’t be tied down with the income that you’re getting from only one client, you can work with as many as you want, and get extra income as a result.   However, no matter how much of a dream working freelance is, you will also find out that there are disadvantages to this set-up as well. If you’re the type to be easily distracted, then it might not be a good idea to work on your own. Your home will have a multitude of distractions that will disrupt work. Your TV set alone will set you back for a good hour or more. Operating expenses also come into play. Since you don’t work inside an office, you also have to understand that you will have to incur the costs of working on your tasks. That includes electricity, your computer (consider that this will break down in the long run), and even your coffee!   Working freelance also means that you do not have the security of having a regular job. Most of the time, freelance jobs are on a per-project basis. Even if the project is long-term, you will always have to be ready if the project suddenly ends. You have to rely on other projects or other jobs to keep you afloat should your main source of income ends.   If you are thinking of pursuing a freelance career as a translator, then make sure that you know the pros and cons well, so you can make informed decisions on how to go about working as a translator.   One piece of advice I can give to any freelance translator is to start using TO3000 as soon as possible. Believe me, it will save you a lot of time and efforts. TO3000 is accounting and project management software developed especially for freelance translators.   More information: http://www.to3000.com/25% discount (for readers of this blog): http://special.translation3000.com/special_to3000 
    539 Posted by Vitaly Pedchenko
  •   Translating documents is a job that would require a lot of concentration and time. If you think it is a no-brainer job, think again. It actually takes a lot of effort to make sure that you are translating documents correctly.   If you are looking to work as a translator, one of your decisions would be whether to work as an in-house translator or a freelance translator. There are pros and cons to both, and in this article, we will be discussing the advantages and disadvantages of working as a freelance translator.   If you are working as a freelance translator, you get to work in the comforts of your home. You can wake up, brew your coffee, and start working while wearing your pajamas! You get to manage your own schedule, and you can take as many breaks as you want. All you need to do is complete all your assignments within the given time table. If you have kids, you can work around your children’s school schedule – you can really be a hands-on parent by working freelance.   Since you are given free rein of your schedule, it is also easy for you to take vacation breaks as needed. You won’t have to go through a long process of getting an approval for your leaves. You can just advise your client beforehand, and you can be on your merry way on your vacation. Just make sure, though that you do not have any pending tasks, or it will really inconvenience your clients.   Another advantage to working freelance is your ability to take on more jobs as needed. If your schedule can handle it, you can speak with other clients and continue working for both. You won’t be tied down with the income that you’re getting from only one client, you can work with as many as you want, and get extra income as a result.   However, no matter how much of a dream working freelance is, you will also find out that there are disadvantages to this set-up as well. If you’re the type to be easily distracted, then it might not be a good idea to work on your own. Your home will have a multitude of distractions that will disrupt work. Your TV set alone will set you back for a good hour or more. Operating expenses also come into play. Since you don’t work inside an office, you also have to understand that you will have to incur the costs of working on your tasks. That includes electricity, your computer (consider that this will break down in the long run), and even your coffee!   Working freelance also means that you do not have the security of having a regular job. Most of the time, freelance jobs are on a per-project basis. Even if the project is long-term, you will always have to be ready if the project suddenly ends. You have to rely on other projects or other jobs to keep you afloat should your main source of income ends.   If you are thinking of pursuing a freelance career as a translator, then make sure that you know the pros and cons well, so you can make informed decisions on how to go about working as a translator.   One piece of advice I can give to any freelance translator is to start using TO3000 as soon as possible. Believe me, it will save you a lot of time and efforts. TO3000 is accounting and project management software developed especially for freelance translators.   More information: http://www.to3000.com/25% discount (for readers of this blog): http://special.translation3000.com/special_to3000 
    Dec 20, 2013 539

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